Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Song Spotlight: "You Say 'Millionaire' Like It's A Good Thing" (Big Cats Remix) + Some Great Links on Wealth and Inequality



“Right now, I feel a need for all of us to breathe fire.” --Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

With more and more discourse lately (online and in real life) about how corrupt and out-of-touch the super-rich are, I wanted to share a few thoughts and links related to this song. "You Say 'Millionaire' Like It's A Good Thing" has been around for a few years-- the original version of the song is available here, and the lyrics are included in my book. This remix, courtesy of Big Cats, is the song's Final Form-- a lean, focused burst of venom directed at the rich.

As a writer and as an activist, I'm really interested in the power of language to reframe issues. It's important to write songs and poems that describe poverty, that tell our stories, and that call us to action toward economic justice; this song, however, was an attempt to do something a little more specific: to reframe the accumulation of wealth as something that is not just "an unfortunate side effect of the system," but rather as something that is *morally* reprehensible.

There are caveats; I'm reminded of Jay-Z's "If you grew up with holes in your zapatos/ you'd celebrate the minute you was having dough." The argument here isn't that all rich people are "bad" on an individual level (although many absolutely are!); it's that a system that makes it possible for the distribution of wealth to be so extremely, so obscenely skewed is flat-out wrong. It is directly responsible for the death and suffering of too many people.

And sure, we can have conversations about how wealth is relative, how even working class people in the US "have it better" than x, y, or z other group... but that's part of the point of the song too-- there's a point where that relativity fails. Maybe it's not at a million dollars exactly; but somewhere on the wealth spectrum, earning becomes hoarding. Need becomes greed. Here are some articles that go more in-depth; I hope they can be useful, especially as so many of us are watching the 2020 candidates navigate this issue:

Christopher Ingraham: "Wealth concentration returning to ‘levels last seen during the Roaring Twenties,’ according to new research" (Washington Post): "American wealth is highly unevenly distributed, much more so than income. According to Zucman’s latest calculations, today the top 0.1 percent of the population has captured nearly 20 percent of the nation’s wealth, giving them a greater slice of the American pie than the bottom 80 percent of the population combined."

Farhad Manjoo: "Abolish Billionaires" (NYT): "But the adulation we heap upon billionaires obscures the plain moral quandary at the center of their wealth: Why should anyone have a billion dollars, why should anyone be proud to brandish their billions, when there is so much suffering in the world?"

Sophie Weiner: "AOC: A Society With Billionaires Cannot Be Moral" (Splinter): "'The question of marginal tax rates is a policy question but it’s also a moral question,' Ocasio-Cortez said. 'What kind of society do we want to live in? Are we comfortable with a society where someone can have a personal helipad while this city is experiencing the highest levels of poverty and homelessness since the Great Depression?'"

A.Q. Smith: "It's Basically Just Immoral To Be Rich" (Current Affairs): "It is not justifiable to retain vast wealth. This is because that wealth has the potential to help people who are suffering, and by not helping them you are letting them suffer. It does not make a difference whether you earned the vast wealth. The point is that you have it. And whether or not we should raise the tax rates, or cap CEO pay, or rearrange the economic system, we should all be able to acknowledge, before we discuss anything else, that it is immoral to be rich. That much is clear."

Charles Mathewes and Evan Sandsmark: "Being rich wrecks your soul. We used to know that." (Washington Post): "As stratospheric salaries became increasingly common, and as the stigma of wildly disproportionate pay faded, the moral hazards of wealth were largely forgotten. But it’s time to put the apologists for plutocracy back on the defensive, where they belong — not least for their own sake. After all, the Buddha, Aristotle, Jesus, the Koran, Jimmy Stewart, Pope Francis and now even science all agree: If you are wealthy and are reading this, give away your money as fast as you can."

Emmie Martin: "Here’s how much money you need to be happy, according to a new analysis by wealth experts" (CNBC): "'The lower a person's annual income falls below that benchmark, the unhappier he or she feels. But no matter how much more than $75,000 people make, they don't report any greater degree of happiness,' Time reported in 2010, citing a study from Princeton University conducted by economist Angus Deaton and psychologist Daniel Kahneman."

Jesus, in the Bible: “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God! Indeed, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”


No comments: